Sample Angular Website

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So I’ve seen a lot of people using AngularJS but I see very few examples of a website made using it. That’s why I decided to post an example website to give you an idea of what a full website looks like using AngularJS. It has samples of some of the things you’ll commonly find in a website made entirely with Angular:

  •  Navigation & Routing
  • Providers & Directives
  • Controllers & Config Blocks
  • Data Calculations
  • Filtering

Sorry if you’re looking for Angular 2.0, this was made with Angular 1.5.8. View, fork and/or edit the files on Plunker!

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Best Tools To Test Your Website’s Responsiveness

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Since converting my game websites to be fully responsive and use HTML5 I’ve gone through a lot of different responsiveness testing tools. So far these are my favorites:

  1. Web Developer – addon for Firefox. This takes the cake for me because it’s already built into the right click menu on my browser so it’s really easy to invoke whenever and wherever. On top of that it’s designed to show you a number of different responsive views at one time and you can customize the views that it shows when it launches. Of course it comes with a whole host of other nifty tools to aid in your web development so it gets a raving 5 stars from me. It’s not as fully fleshed out in Chrome but there is a Chrome version as well. The only downside to this tool is that if you change something and you want to see an update of your changes you can’t just refresh the screen that pops up in a new tab. Instead you have to close the tab and launch the responsive view from the right click menu. Not a huge bother but it could be improved upon.
  2. http://quirktools.com/screenfly/ – simple, intuitive interface. Just enter your website and you’re well on your way for an easy experience to view your site on phones, tables and even televisions. The downside of this website is that you have to reload it every time you want to check what a different page of your website would look like.
  3. http://ipadpeek.com/ – the ipad and iphone emulator. It looks like an ipad and it does a pretty good job emulating an ipad and iphone — it will even show screen rotations. The only downside to this is that it doesn’t let you change version of the ipad because I believe the newest AIR 2 has a larger screen than the one in this emulator but I could be wrong.
  4. http://www.mobilephoneemulator.com/ – the multi-phone emulator. So this isn’t nearly as easy to use as the item in the number 2 spot which is why it’s bumped down a spot on my list even though it has a much wider array of phones you can test your site on including some of the popular android, htc and samsung phones. Just pick the make and model and enter your website and this site will render it to the proper screen size.
  5. http://ready.mobi/– last but not least. Although this doesn’t rank high in the visual department this is an excellent tool for evaluating what issues your markup may present to mobile users. Things like images exceeding certain file size and dimensions (which make for a slow mobile experience) and how your file sizes will impact your loading times are why this site makes my list. The downside is that it doesn’t visually show you what your responsive site will look like but it takes an analytical approach which is super helpful and informative regardless.

Now it looks like you’re ready to check out these 11 unconventional programming tips to improve your programming skills!

Game Journal 1.4: Create A Game With A Passive Player

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In my last entry I created 5 games inspired by my every day life. This next exercise challenges you to start a game journal and design a new game every day. Since I’m already doing all the exercises from this book as my game journal I’m going to nix this exercise in favor of my own 🙂

Exercise 1.4

Create a game with a passive player. I guess the first thing I have to do is explain my definition of a passive player. A passive player cannot interact directly with the game, only indirectly. Direct interaction is anything the player does to change the state, status, movement, characters coordinates, or any other variables in the game. Therefore a passive player cannot use any sort of input device to interact with the game, including devices like the playstation Eye and the xbox Move.

Pinpoint

The game I came up with is called Pinpoint. It uses the GPS on your 3G phone. Aside from installing the game the player cannot interact with the game screen or any notification that’s displayed — not even to start/stop the game. The game runs as a background process so it’s always active when your phone is on.

As far as gameplay goes, think of trying to find a needle in a haystack. Each level in Pinpoint challenges you to find a location containing the object it’s looking for. For instance, level one asks you to find a certain brand of coffee. As you travel around during your normal day Pinpoint sends you “hot” and “cold” messages when you move closer to or further away from a location with the target item. When you reach a location with the target item you get a level up and can start looking for the next item. Pinpoint has two modes, easy and hard. In easy mode you’re told what the object is at the start of every level. In hard mode you’re never told what the object is until you find a location that has it.

There is no ultimate winner or looser in Pinpoint. A high score board–shown each time you find a new object–will keep you up to date as to where you rank against other Pinpoint players.

Video Game References: 3D Models, Degrees, Associations & Other Useful Links

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I find that I visit so many different sites I can’t keep them straight and I can’t remember to update my delicious account. So I started adding them as resources on my main website when I found one I liked or wanted to go back to someday in the future. Here’s a list you may want to check them out for yourself. I’ve added my own comments and knowledge thrown into the mix:

Game Engines

Crystal Space 3D

Dark GDK

G3D Engine – good tool libraries, large free model collections

jMonkey Engine

Panda3D

Torque Engine – popular with independent developers

Unreal Engine – it’s a classic… now available for free.

MMO Specific

Unity 3D – in browser 3D MMO games, quickly gaining popularity as an engine. Has iPhone and Wii capabilities.

Big World Technology

Byond – not really an engine so much as a point and click game maker

Hero Engine

Irrlicht – i really like this one, runs fast, lightweight, nice toolset. Free. Showcase includes

Multiverse

Ogre 3D – i found this one to be way too complicated and not very well planned out. API was hard to use and understand if you want something you can just jump into and start programming.

Realm Crafter

Flash Specific

SmartFoxServer – Specifically for Flash MMOs.  I’ve chosen this one for an MMO I have in production. Free for up to 20 users, license required for 100, 500, and unlimited users ($300 – $3,000 dollars). Showcase games include Club Penguin, Atlantas and facebook’s app YoVille, and Build-a-Bear Workshop.

Red5 Server – Completely open source and free. If you’re looking to build on your own functionality this one is for you

Electro Server – Haven’t had a chance to play around with this one but it has a free 25 user version. Licenses for up to 500 – 200,000 users ($700 to $4,500+) — no unlimited license that I could find.  Showcase games include WebKinz, Nickeldeon and Barbie Let’s Chat.

3D Models

3D Cafe

3D Links

3D M3

3D Revolution

TurboSquid – largest collection of models made in Maya

WireCase

Quality 3D

Poitra – expensive but nice stuff

Exchange 3D

DAZ 3D

Archive 3D – all free models

3D Extras – free models

Amazing 3D

3D Software

Maya – industry leader, costs a fortune though

3Ds Max – also an industry leader but cheaper than Maya. Owned by the same company.

Blender – free, can integrate python and lua scripting. Good support community, so-so documentation.

Drawing & Art Software

Photoshop -leading graphic art software, if you don’t have this you might as well quit now…

Painter – exclusively for people drawing with tablets

Gimp – essentially a free version of photoshop

Associations

ECA – Electronic Consumers Association

ESA – Electronic Software Association

ESRB – Entertainment Software Rating Board

IGDA – International Game Developers Association

Artists

Geninne – artist in Mexico, I want her on one of my projects one day

Creative Thursday – artists post to a new topic every thursday, great way to find a diamond in the rough

Illustration Friday – same as Creative Thursday with a bigger following

Simon Reeves – freelance 3D artist. Has done several commercials so I doubt he’s cheap.

Sarah J How – worked with her on graphics for one of my pet games. Highly recommended. She was a texture/character artists for Deep Red Games, looks like she’s running her own studio now.

DeviantArt.com – tons of various artists. As a last resort you can probably find someone here.

Video Games Boost Child Development & Health Presented By the Wilson Center

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I got an email about this just this morning. Sounds interesting. It will focus on how video games and emerging media can be beneficial to children and teens. It’s a nice change from all the negative press video games get from educators.

Live Webcast starts 12noon EST on June 23rd, 2009 and runs till about 2pm EST. You can find the link to listen in here. Or you can download the whitepaper and/or the presentation.